Taiwan

  • CHEN Maa-ling

    National Taiwan University
    Professor
    Archaeology

    – Click Here Research Profile –

    Maa-ling Chen is a professor of Archaeology at the Department of Anthropology in National Taiwan University. She received her PhD from Arizona State University. Her research mainly focuses on spatial analysis and ceramic archaeology of both Neolithic and Proto-historic periods in Taiwan. In recent years, she has been involved working with an indigenous community and their abandoned settlements in southern tip of Taiwan. She also involved in some Interdisciplinary projects concern Isotope analysis on human and animal skeletons and the application of GIS and 3D in Archaeological research. She and Mu-chun Wu collaboratively suggested a new approach-road analysis to demonstrate the capability of GIS and certain spatial analysis technology, can be used as a new approach to archaeological research, especially on topic such as landscape which possesses both spatial properties and social-cultural contexts, both abstract and concrete aspects of a culture

  • COHEN David

    National Taiwan University
    Assistant Professor
    Archaeology

  • CHIANG Chihhula

    National Taiwan University
    Assistant Professor
    Archaeology

  • WU Mu-chen

    National Taiwan University
    Assistant Professor
    Archaeology

    – Click Here Research Profile –

    My research investigates the embodiment and active perception of agency in landscape archaeology and spatial analysis. My research in this area takes place at the intersection between digital computing (GIS & VR) and archaeology, and is motivated primarily by the desire to understand agency and perception. I am co-director of the ‘Archaeological Research of the Spacva Environs (ARoSE)’ Project where I investigate the Bronze Age landscape and social relations involving multiple Tumulus and Tell sites in the Spacva basin in the east part of Croatia. I also worked over a decade on the Kaushi Research Project where I examine the spatial concepts of the Paiwan people and how it is structured and restructures social relations both at the settlement and at the landscape scale in Taiwan. My most recent work has focused on the development of digital presentations of archaeological information for public inclusion and community outreach.

  • LIN Hsuman

    National Museum of Prehistory
    Associate Research Fellow
    Bioarchaeology

  • YEN Chang-keng

    National Museum of Prehistory
    Assistant Research Fellow
    Archaeology

  • Kuei-chen Lin

    Institute of History and Philology, Academic Sinica
    Associate Reserch Fellow
    Archaeology

    – Click Here Research Profile –

    Kuei-chen Lin obtained her PhD degree from UCLA in 2013. Her research interests include Chinese archaeology, community archaeology, urbanization, environments, and the relationships between production and social complexity. She observes self-organized, small-scaled activities of production and the social life of the products to see their effects in social relationships. She focuses the case study on Bronze Age Sichuan, China, but also hopes to extend such investigations for broader regions and different periods of time.

  • LEE Cheng-yi

    Institute of History and Philology, Academic Sinica
    Post Doctoer
    Geoarchaeology

    – Click Here Research Profile –

    My research focuses on the application of scientific techniques to archaeological research. I specialize on carbon, nitrogen, oxygen and strontium isotope analysis of archaeological material in order to better understand the past. I am particularly interested in past human and animal diets, the cultural and natural causes of dietary variation, migration of individual and populations, crop spread and consumption. I am also interested in the effect of climate on past human societies and subsistence practices. My current research uses stable isotope analysis to explore the subsistence and migration of people who lived in prehistoric Sichuan, China (c.6000-2000BP). I am applying carbon, nitrogen, oxygen and strontium isotope analysis on bones and teeth, and plant materials to ask a range of questions considering climate change, animal husbandry, crop management and food consumption.

  • LIU Chung-Yu

    National Taiwan University
    Doctoral student
    Archaeology

    – Click Here Research Profile –

    My research interests include social, computational, indigenous, and landscape archaeology.Since 2014, my research has focused on several abandoned settlements of Kucapungane, one of the indigenous groups in southern Taiwan. Based on oral histories and ethnographic studies, Kucapungane people had lived in Old-Kucapungane settlement for the past 600-700 years. However, they were forced to move out the village 50 years ago and built other villages after due to government policies and typhoons. The aim of my research is to study how the spatial construction could embed the transformation process of Kucapungane’ social structure through a comparative study on space syntax analysis of abandoned settlements and ethnographic records. The result expected to bring some implications: (1) providing new insights to retrofitting the spatial characteristics of social processes observed in the ethnographies; (2) demonstrating how Kucapungane social structure and landscape were integrated in the past.

  • CHU Whei-lee

    Anthropology Department, National Museum of Natural Science
    Associate Research Fellow
    Archaeology

    – Click Here Research Profile –

    I have participated many excavations in sites of Taiwan, especially Peinan, Li-toushan sites in the eastern and the northern part of Taiwan. In the recent years, I have more focused one working in the sites of Taichung. We collected evidence from the natural sediments of the river, analyzed the animal and plant remains. In addition to the interpretation of the typology of the artifacts and their relation to prehistoric environment, we also concern about the preservation of the sites, the meaning of the heritage to the public and how to generate sustainable societies from promoting the education of archaeology.

  • Bing-wen Liu

    National Taiwan University
    Master student
    Archaeology

    – Click Here Research Profile –

    Thesis title “Style Analysis on Pottery from Neolithic to Metal Ages in East Coast of Taiwan.” I have been interested in approaching from technical choice to study these aspects could be reflected from pottery manufacture such as the adaptation to natural resources, production organization, process of technological learning and teaching. My study areas have been focused on the Neolithic Cultures in East Taiwan and recently on Okhotsk Culture in Hokkaido.

  • CHEN Po-Yang

    National Taiwan University
    Master student
    Archaeology

  • WANG zheng-Qian

    National Taiwan University
    Master student
    Archaeology

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