Canada

  • NICHOLAS George

    Simon Fraser University
    Professor, Chair of Archaeology
    Archaeology

    – Click Here Research Profile –

    George Nicholas (Professor, Chair of Archaeology) has a long involvement with community-based or -oriented research. He was director of the Intellectual Property Issues in Cultural Heritage (IPinCH) project (2008-2016). This initiative brought together an international team of 50 scholars, 25 partnering organizations, and 140 Associate and student members to examine the theoretical, ethical, and practical implications of commodification, appropriation, and other flows of knowledge about heritage, and with how these may affect communities, researchers, and other stakeholders (www.sfu.ca/ipinch). Nicholas also developed and directed SFU’s Indigenous Archaeology Program in Kamloops (1991?2005), and has worked closely with the Secwepemc and other First Nations in British Columbia, and Indigenous groups worldwide for 30 years. He has been engaged in community-based research in Canada (Secwepemc, Sto:lo, Blood, Inuit) and the United States (Hopi, Saginaw-Chippewa, Penobscot), Japan (Ainu), New Zealand (Maori), and with various other groups in Australia, Africa, and Kyrgystan. In 2013, he received the inaugural “Partnership Impact Award” from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council.

  • HENNESEY Kate

    Simon Fraser University
    Associate professor
    Anthropology, Interactive Arts

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    Kate Hennessy is an Associate Professor specializing in Media at Simon Fraser University’s School of Interactive Arts and Technology (SIAT). As an anthropologist of media and the director of the Making Culture Lab at SIAT, her research explores the role of digital technology in the documentation and safeguarding of cultural heritage. Her multimedia research-creation works investigate documentary methodologies to address Indigenous and settler histories of place and space. She is a founding member of the Ethnographic Terminalia Collective, which has curated exhibitions and projects at the intersection of anthropology and contemporary art since 2009. Her work has been published in journals such as Leonardo, Cultural Anthropology, and PUBLIC.

  • REIMER Rudy

    Simon Fraser University
    Associate professor
    Archaeology, First Nations Studies

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  • WINTER Barbara

    Simon Fraser University
    Curator
    Archaeology; Museums

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  • ATLEO Clifford

    Simon Fraser University
    Instructor
    Indigenous Environmental Management and Governance

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  • MELOCHE Chelsea

    Simon Fraser University
    Doctoral student
    Archaeology

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    Chelsea is a Ph.D. student in the Department of Archaeology at Simon Fraser University, where she is researching the question of what happens after repatriation. For her dissertation research, Chelsea is carrying out a comparative case study to explore community experiences with repatriation processes and outcomes. Her goal for this work is to foster a better understanding of how repatriation may affect those communities seeking to return their ancestors, belongings and cultural knowledge, and, more generally, to consider the role of repatriation within larger reconciliation efforts. Chelsea also has a B.A. in Anthropology and an M.A. in Sociology from the University of Windsor, where she worked with a local First Nation to facilitate and document the return of a group of ancestors.

  • TARLE Lia

    Simon Fraser University
    Doctoral student
    Archaeology

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    Lia is a Doctoral Candidate in Archaeology and a Research Associate at the Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology at Simon Fraser University in Canada. Her doctoral research focuses on ethical issues relating to human remains in museums, and the varying factors (e.g., cultural/spiritual beliefs, historical and political contingencies) that influence the treatment of institutionalized human remains. Her work addresses changing archaeological and museum ethics, the historical collection and representation of human bodies by museums and scientific institutions, and repatriation issues. Lia has worked as a visiting researcher at the Bristol Museum and Art Gallery in the United Kingdom and the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History in the United States. She has also worked in collections management at the Royal BC Museum and the Museum of Archaeology and Ethnography in Canada and was a Research Associate for the Intellectual Property Issues in Cultural Heritage project. She has worked on archaeological excavations in Europe and North America for the past ten years and has taught archaeology at Simon Fraser University for eight years. She is also on the editorial board for the open-access cultural heritage journal, Inlet: Contributions to Archaeology. Lia has an MA in Archaeology from Simon Fraser University (focusing on clothing use during the Middle to Upper Palaeolithic transition), and a BA (Honours with Distinction) in Anthropology and Hispanic Studies from the University of Victoria, Canada. She has also studied museum curation and communication, public programming and interpretation, and exhibition design through the University of Victoria’s postgraduate Museum Studies program.

  • ROWLEY Susan

    University of British Columbia
    Associate professor
    Archaeology and Anthropology

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  • SCHAEPE David

    Research and Resource Management Centre of Sto:lo Nation
    Director
    Archaeology

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    David M. Schaepe, Director of the Sto:l? Research and Resource Management Centre at Sto:lo Nation, has worked for over thirty years in the fields of archaeology and heritage stewardship. Over the last two decades working for the Sto:l? (People of the River) he gained experience in Indigenous rights and title, archaeological theory and practice, repatriation, cultural landscapes, health and wellbeing, cultural education, and inter-governmental relations. He has published in volumes and journals including the Oxford Handbook on Public Heritage, American Antiquity and Current Anthropology. He was a co-editor and contributor to A Sto:l?-Coast Salish Historical Atlas (2001), and more recently co-editor of Towards a New Ethnohistory (2018) and editor of Being Ts’elxweyeqw: First Peoples’ Voices and History from the Chilliwack-Fraser Valley, British Columbia (2018). He is a member of the provincial Joint Working Group on First Nations Heritage Conservation. He received his Ph.D. from the University of British Columbia and continues to be gratefully schooled by colleagues and Sto:l? knowledge holders.

  • AIRD Karen

    Board member for ICOMOS Canada
    Coordinator
    Cultural Heritage

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    A member of Saulteau First Nations in Treaty 8 Territory of BC, Karen Aird has worked as an archaeologist then in cultural heritage management for the past 23 years on many projects that convey a strong sense of place in Indigenous landscapes, encompassing the stories, legal traditions and the intangible and tangible elements into Indigenous heritage. As a consultant, Karen has worked as the Cultural Heritage Planner for the Treaty 8 Tribal Association, the Tse’K’wa (the Charlie Lake Cave house) Heritage Society and the Nun WaDee (Dane-zaa Caretakers Society); as project coordinator for Tk’emlups te Secwepemc Cultural Heritage Study; and as Curator for the Secwepemc Museum and Heritage Park. And, more recently, Karen has embarked on the position of Heritage Manager for First Peoples Cultural Council. Karen is one of the founding directors and now the President of the National Indigenous Heritage Circle, a non- profit organizations focused on the identification, management, and conservation of Indigenous heritage.

  • NIKA Collison Jisgang

    Haida Gwaii Musuem
    Curator
    Language, Art and Culture

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  • Michael Hathaway

    Simon Fraser University
    Associate, Professor
    Cultural anthropology

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    Michael Hathaway is an associate professor of cultural anthropology at Simon Fraser University in Vancouver, British Columbia. He studies the intersection of indigenous politics and environmentalism in China, and more recently, has been exploring how indigeneity has emerged in the Asia-Pacific region through transnational encounters. His first book, Environmental Winds: Making the Global in Southwest China (University of California Press, 2013) explores how environmentalism was refashioned in China, not only by conservationists but also by rural villagers and even animals themselves. His second major project examines the global commodity chain of the matsutake, one of the world’s most expensive mushrooms, following it from the highlands of the Tibetan Plateau to the markets of urban Japan. He works with other members of the Matsutake Worlds Research Group, looking at the social worlds this mushroom engenders in Canada, the United States, China, and Japan.

  • WATKINS Joe

    Maryland University
    Adjunct Associate professor
    Archaeology

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    Joe Watkins, a member of the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma, has been involved in anthropology for fifty years. He has held a variety of academic, governmental, and private positions through his career. He received his Bachelors of Arts degree from the University of Oklahoma (1973) and his Masters of Arts (1977) and Doctor of Philosophy (1994) degrees from Southern Methodist University. He has served in numerous capacities in international, national, regional and local organizations and has been intensively involved in initiatives at the national level, most recently as President of the Society for American Archaeology (2019-2021). He has published numerous articles and book chapters on the ethical practice of anthropology and anthropology’s relationships with descendant communities including American Indians, Australian Aboriginals, New Zealand Maori, and the Japanese Ainu. His book Indigenous Archaeology: American Indian Values and Scientific Practice (AltaMira Press 2000) defined the international field of practice.

  • CUSACK-MCVEIGH Holly

    Indiana University-Purdue University
    Professor
    Anthropology

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  • CAROL Ellick

    Maryland University
    Research Associate, Adjunct Instuctor
    Archaeology

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